Conference round-up: “A common international standard for rare materials? Why? And how?” (22 February 2016, Lisbon)

A view from the speaker's podium, at the start of the IFLA RBSCS's "A common international standard for rare materials? Why? And how?" conference, 22 February 2016, Biblioteca Nacional de Portugal

A view from the speaker’s podium, at the start of the IFLA RBSCS’s “A common international standard for rare materials? Why? And how?” conference, 22 February 2016, Biblioteca Nacional de Portugal

IFLA A3v1_1On the 22nd of February 2016, the IFLA Rare Books and Special Collections Section delivered a one-day conference, hosted by the Biblioteca Nacional de Portugal, on the topic of changing trends in international descriptive standards for rare materials. The conference, entitled “A common international standard for rare materials? Why? And how?” provided a platform for 10 presentations from speakers from institutions from the United States, Portugal, Spain, the United Kingdom, Germany and Sweden, and was attended by over 70 delegates from 14 different countries.

A full programme of this conference can be found in a previous post on this blog, and many of the papers from which the speakers presented from are currently being edited for a forthcoming special issue of Cataloging & Classification Quarterly. However, many delegates asked if the presentations would be freely made available online, and so this blog post is answering that need. What follows are the abstracts and powerpoint presentations from the conference:

 

Dr Claudia Fabian (Bayerische Staatsbibliothek) – “RDA and Cultural Heritage- a new starting point for international cooperation?”

Abstract

Slideshow:

fabian thumb

Adelaida Caro Martin (Biblioteca Nacional España) – “RDA & Rare Materials: What is being done at the Spanish National Library”

Abstract

Slideshow:

caro thumbs

Todd Fell & Francis Lapka (Yale University) – “ISBD and DCRM into RDA: An opportunity for convergence?”

Abstract

Slideshow:

fell thumbs

Fernanda Santos & Pedro Estácio (School of Arts and Humanities Library, University of Lisbon) – “Private libraries as special collections in academic and research libraries: description challenges and users’ needs: a case study”

Abstract

Slideshow:

santos thumbs

Peter Sjökvist (Uppsala University Library) – “Transcription in Rare Books Cataloguing”

Abstract

Slideshow:

sjokvist thumbs

 

Ana Cristina de Santana Silva, Teresa Duarte Ferreira and Lígia de Azevedo Martins (Biblioteca Nacional de Portugal) – “Development and challenges in old manuscripts cataloguing: the experience of the National Library of Portugal”

Abstract

Slideshow:

silva thumbs

Antje Theise (State and University Library Hamburg) – “The collection of engravings at the Hamburg State and University Library (SUB) –possibilities of standardized cataloguing of graphic prints”

Abstract

Slideshow:

theise thumbs

Benito Rial Costas (Independent researcher, Spain) – “Toward a Description of Incunabula Gothic Typefounts and Typefaces”

Abstract

David Farneth (Getty Research Institute) – How Can We Achieve GLAM? Understanding and Overcoming the Challenges to Integrating Metadata Across Museums, Archives, and Libraries (a moderated CIDOC/GLAM discussion)”

Abstract

Slideshow:

farneth thumbs

 

Axel Ermert (Institute for Museum Research – SMB/PK, Berlin) – “A Cataloging Standard for Rare Materials? Some Reflections on the possible Contribution of Terminology to such an Endeavour”

Abstract (forthcoming)

Slideshow: (forthcoming)

Anne Welsh (University College London) – “The Rare Books Catalogue as the Foundation of the Scholarly Database”

Abstract

Slideshow:

welsh thumbs

The day’s activities can also be recounted through the hashtag used for the day, #rarematcat.

The day was full of formal and informal conversations between delegates and the standing committee members present, and was especially thought-provoking especially for the Standing Committee members of the IFLA RBSCS.

Daryl Green, IFLA RBSCS Information Coordinator, University of St Andrews Library


You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *